Great Mattress Expectations

I’m a firm believer of people doing what they say that they are going to do.  There is nothing worse than not meeting expectations.  I was thinking about this today, and believe that this idea extends to mattresses.  What expectations should you have from your mattress, and what is just wishful thinking?

Once you go out and survive the selection process, you really want to believe that you’ve purchased the perfect mattress, and that it will solve all of your sleeping problems.  Here are some tips so that you won’t be let down after that first night:

  • Chances are, you’re not going to fall in love with your new mattress the first night.  In fact, you might not sleep really well.  Your body is used to the certain feel and support level that your old mattress was giving (or not!), and adjusting to a new mattress may take a little time.  We recommend that you sleep on the bed for at least fourteen days before deciding if it’s the one for you or not.
  • A mattress is not a miracle worker.  It’s not going to fix your slipped disc, or make your fifty year old body feel like it’s twenty again.  You’re not going to wake up feeling great after a day of yard work outside, no matter how expensive your mattress is.  Your fibromyalgia will not miraculously disappear, and it’s probably not going to make your spouse stop snoring.  It will, however, help you stay comfortable and supported, for long term well-being.
  • When you sit on the side of a mattress, it’s going to depress.  Period.  If you purchased a soft mattress, the edge support is going to match the feel of the bed.  If the edge was super hard, and the rest of the mattress was soft, you’d be sleeping uphill.  Edge support is meant to be durable, not necessarily firm.  Some hard mattresses may have very firm edge support, but most beds do not.  It’s all about durability, not feel, when it comes to edge support.
  • Mattresses with a significant amount of padding, such as pillow tops, euro tops, and box tops are going to develop body impressions.  They are completely normal.  They don’t change the support or the feel, they don’t mean that the bed is failing, and they don’t denote a defect.  Foam is soft and porous.  If you put 150lbs of anything on a piece of foam for eight hours a night, every night, for ten years, it would probably leave an imprint.  Beds are no different.  Only when the coil system sags is there a difference in the feel and support of the bed (which of course is covered by your manufacturer’s warranty).
  • Buy what is the most comfortable for YOU.  Don’t buy a particular model because your sister has one and likes it, and don’t let the salesperson steer you to a different bed than the one that you really like the feel of.  No one is sleeping on this bed but you, and you know your body the best.
  • Finally, my pet peeve – don’t expect a cheap mattress to perform the same way as an expensive mattress will,  There are HUGE differences between price ranges.  Don’t expect a cheap bed to last for ten years, and always feel great.  If you want to get a lot out of your bed, you’ve got to put at least something into it.

Bottom line, a new mattress isn’t going to solve all of your problems.  It can, however, ease some pain, help you sleep better, keep you cooler at night, even keep you from tossing and turning.  Keeping your expectations realistic can really help you have a positive bedding experience, and be satisfied with your purchase.

This entry was posted in Mattresses, Miscellaneous and tagged , , , by Alyssa Linvill. Bookmark the permalink.

About Alyssa Linvill

Alyssa has been in the mattress industry since 2001, and is very interested in how sleep and comfort affect our quality of life. She has done extensive research regarding the way that mattresses and sleep position both aggravate and alleviate common medical conditions such as arthritis, fibromyalgia, and sleep apnea. Currently, Alyssa is helping seniors in Central Florida get a better night's sleep at Dr Snooze, where more attention is paid to the clinical and scientific side of mattress selection. She also writes the blog for Dr Snooze, and has put out many different articles and writings about medical conditions and sleep, as well as reviews on products and ways of making sleeping and mattresses healthier.

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